Mostly Photos :: Eric Etheridge

Breach of Peace: Portraits of the Mississippi Freedom Riders

Posted on July 01, 2006, in Mississippi. | Tag this with del.icio.us

Comments

please inform me as other portraits are made available to the public. it's important this part of us history not be lost or forgotten. it also shows the power of the indiviual to make a contribution & difference in society. unfortunately, far too many of today's youth don't have that sense of optimism & power.

Posted by: jay muse at July 3, 2006 03:57 AM

please inform me as other portraits are made available to the public. it's important this part of us history not be lost or forgotten. it also shows the power of the indiviual to make a contribution & difference in society. unfortunately, far too many of today's youth don't have that sense of optimism & power.

jay muse

Posted by: jay muse at July 3, 2006 03:57 AM

What a wonderful piece of history you have documented. While I understand this is a continuing project,is there a possibility of the exisitng collection being exhibited? I am director of The Howard Thurman Center at Boston University.

Posted by: katherine kennedy at July 3, 2006 04:18 PM

Thank you for documenting these brave individuals and for documenting this significant movement. I am curator at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, TN and would like to learn of the possibility of an exhibition of your work on this subject.

Please keep me posted as things develop and other images are added to the site.

Posted by: Barbara Andrews at July 3, 2006 05:02 PM

Please let me know as soon as you have these available. These people are our elders, our inspiration. They have walked the path ahead of us and lead the way with such dignity and courage. We need to see their faces, to know what true elders look like.
I am so grateful for your work,
Sherry Anderson,
co author, The Cultural Creatives; The Feminine Face of God.

Posted by: Sherry Ruth Anderson at July 3, 2006 07:57 PM

I was struck by the dates of the arrests in the NYT photos---it's my husband's actual birthday. Thank you for documenting the struggles of those whose work allowed him to have a better life as an african american man than they did. I'll be saving the Times clip for our son, so that when he's older, I can help him understand his history and the sacrifices others have made for him and generations to come.

Posted by: Lisa Gomez at July 5, 2006 11:26 AM

Thank you for sharing your work with the public, what an amazing project. I was born in 1968 and I've often wondered what happened to the many young people who participated in these protest; how were their futures shaped by their participation and what are they doing now to advance racial equality. Please keep me posted in new photos and bios. Good luck and God's Speed on future successes.

Posted by: Indigo at July 5, 2006 02:37 PM

Thank you for documenting this. I intend to share these pictures and memories with my eleventh grade students after we study Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience." Best of luck in this very important project.

Posted by: Roxanne Guillory at July 7, 2006 10:19 AM

fabu! when's the book due out?

Posted by: lawrence d. warren at July 7, 2006 02:32 PM

I wanted you to know tat I posted a link to your wonderfully important and creative work on my own blog http://politicstheoryphotography.blogspot.com/; If you have plans to mount a touring exhibiiton let me knkow as I'd like to arrange for it to come to Rochester (NY) too!

Posted by: Jim Johnson at July 10, 2006 11:41 AM


I was so struck by the photos in the NY Times Mag that I cut them out and brought them into work to post near my desk with a few other faces that give me hope and persistence. I never got South myself during that stretch of history, but my own life has been so deeply shaped by what those folks did that they feel like my people. Please let me know when there is an exhibit or when you publish these.

Posted by: janet gallagher at August 24, 2006 03:57 PM

Thanks for sharing this wonderful piece of history. Having grown up in North Carolina, I know the story. I was able to participate in the marches in Raleigh,NC in 1963 while attending St. Agustine's as we marched with the students from Shaw Uiniversity. We thank the Freedom Riders for their support as we stand today on all of their shoulders!!!

Posted by: Nan Puryear at June 18, 2007 08:54 AM